Photo of Adrianna ScheerCook

Adrianna is an associate in the firm’s Corporate practice, where she focuses on providing regulatory and corporate advice to financial institutions, advising them on a variety of regulatory and compliance matters, including in connection with applications to federal regulatory agencies. She also represents financial institutions regarding securities offerings, securities regulation, mergers and acquisitions, and general corporate governance.

On January 29, the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (OCC) issued a notice of proposed rulemaking regarding its review of business combinations under the Bank Merger Act (BMA). Specifically, the OCC proposed: (i) amendments to 12 C.F.R. § 5.33 to remove provisions related to expedited review and the use of streamlined business combination applications subject to BMA review; and (ii) the adoption of an official policy statement setting forth general principles the OCC will use in its review of applications subject to the BMA. If adopted as proposed, the rulemaking will likely lead to longer approval timelines for certain national bank transactions, particularly for mergers involving well-managed, well-capitalized community banks, internal corporate reorganizations, and branch acquisitions that would have otherwise been able to take advantage of expedited review. Currently, assuming certain criteria are met, a BMA filing that qualifies as a business reorganization eligible for a streamlined application is deemed approved on the 15th day after the close of the comment period, unless the OCC notifies the applicant that the filing is not eligible for expedited review or the expedited review process is extended. However, if the rulemaking is adopted as proposed, § 5.33 would be amended to remove the procedures for expedited review and the use of streamlined applications.

In the absence of comprehensive federal action, states and regulators are enacting legislation and issuing guidance requiring climate-related disclosures, stepping in to fill the void left by the U.S. Securities Exchange Commission’s (SEC) delay on a climate risk disclosure rule.

On July 18, Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (OCC) Senior Deputy Comptroller for Large Bank Supervision Greg Coleman testified on OCC supervision of climate-related financial risks before the U.S. House of Representatives’ Committee on Financial Services’ Subcommittee on Financial Institutions and Monetary Policy.